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ATTENTION: THIS IS AN ARCHIVAL WEB SITE.


The BCERF program on the Cancer Risks of Environmental Chemicals in the Home and Workplace closed on March 31, 2010. No further updates will be made to this web site. Please go Cornell University’s eCommons web site to access BCERF’s archived research and educational materials (http://ecommons.library.cornell.edu/handle/1813/14300).

Suzanne Snedeker, Ph.D.
Associate Director of Translational Research

Dr. Suzanne Snedeker is the Associate Director for Translational Research for the Program on Breast Cancer and Environmental Risk Factors (BCERF) at Cornell University. Translational research is an emerging field where basic research is translated into information, tools, or resources that can be used by other scientists, medical professionals, public health educators, and the public for sound decision making and risk reduction.

After earning her bachelor's degree at Cornell University and doctoral degree in nutritional sciences at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, she taught nutritional biochemistry and research methods at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, Texas. She then moved to North Carolina to complete several post-doctoral fellowships at the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences in heavy metal toxicology (metal-induced kidney cancer) and mammary gland (breast) cancer biology. Before joining the Cornell faculty, she was a Biologist in the National Toxicology Program, and evaluated the effect of endocrine-disrupting environmental chemicals on reproduction and incidence of cancer using laboratory animal models.

Suzanne's responsibilities at BCERF include writing evaluations of the scientific literature on the relationship of environmental chemicals to cancer risk. These evaluations are translated into consumer-friendly fact sheets for the non-scientist. She also develops web-based modules and databases on environmental chemicals and cancer risk. These include modules on the cancer risk of agricultural and turf pesticides, as well as the cancer risk associated with workplace exposures to chemicals. Other responsibilities include writing commentaries on recent research on cancer and the environment for the BCERF newsletter, The Ribbon, and writing articles for cancer survivor, environmental, and agricultural publications. She has given numerous presentations and workshops on environmental factors and cancer risk, and also serves on state and federal advisory panels as a cancer and environment expert.

      dot Staff:  Suzanne Snedeker:    cv